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Jan 19 09 1:07 PM

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I was given two ox hearts by a friend. They were originally for the dog, but since they're organic riverford ox hearts I thought I'd reserve them for the humans and give them a try.

I have heard that provided you trim the valves and fat this isn't as tough and nasty a peice of meat as it first seems. So I'm trying to come up with some ideas on how to cook them.

My first idea, my fall back for any cut or type of meat I've not had to cook before - curry.

And beyond that I'm stumped. Any suggestions?
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#2 [url]

Jan 19 09 1:29 PM

considering the work an ox heart has done in its life it will be best slow cooked, for lambs hearts I normally stuff them with sage and onion stuffing and then braise them on some chopped onion, carrot and leek in stock for about an hour, thn take th hearts out and add tomato puree tothe stock to thicken it and then strain it over the hearts to serve.
A lambs heart is about 200g so im guessing an ox heart is going to take a good few hours unless you slice it into smaller chuncks first.
another way I have cooked it is stuffed and then roasted in a covered dish, or in a foil tent in the oven but again its going to take a few hours.

dont forget the harder a muscle has worked in its life the tougher it will be and the longer it should be cooked to soften it

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#3 [url]

Jan 19 09 10:09 PM

My gran used to call it "workmans goose".
If you slice the heart open and remove the valves and stringy bits, Then fill with a good sage & onion stuffing and tie up. Pop into a large roaster(one with a lid if you have one) with some stock and cook in a low oven for 3-5 hrs. It takes a good long slow cook, but it's well worth it. the flavour is superb and texture similar to goose, hence the name! The stock makes the gravy. My gran also used to put the veg in with it too and popped some little dumplings in as well.

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#4 [url]

Jan 20 09 12:20 PM

Like Pilsbury i stuff with sage and onion wrap in foil and slow roast on gas mark 3 for about 3 hours and it comes out beautifully tender and tasty.

Grow it, catch it, forage for it, cook it, eat it, enjoy it.

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#5 [url]

Jan 20 09 1:01 PM

wychwood wrote:
My gran used to call it "workmans goose".
If you slice the heart open and remove the valves and stringy bits, Then fill with a good sage & onion stuffing and tie up. Pop into a large roaster(one with a lid if you have one) with some stock and cook in a low oven for 3-5 hrs. It takes a good long slow cook, but it's well worth it. the flavour is superb and texture similar to goose, hence the name! The stock makes the gravy. My gran also used to put the veg in with it too and popped some little dumplings in as well.


Dumplings have won the vote. Might now need to feed one of the hearts to the dog, but certainly sounds like one of them is going to be cooked like this. Yum.

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#6 [url]

Jan 20 09 11:43 PM

Glad you're going for it, ox heart really is an underrated meat as long as you treat it with some tlc you get a great meal. Let us know how it goes!

The older we grow, the greater becomes our wonder at how much ignorance one can contain without bursting one's clothes. Mark Twain.

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#7 [url]

Feb 5 09 6:24 PM

Well yesterday I unwrapped my new slow cooker, washed the bits and then set about cutting up the ox heart.

The first one I decided just to chuck in with a jar of curry because it was the day we went to the supermarket and there wasn't much in the house when I started cooking. So I chucked it in and left it on low. Hours later when the housemate came home he said he could smell it outside of the house and wondered where the lovely smell was coming from.

Well the beef heart was lovely. I can see how it makes a lovely gravy. It's got a distinct taste/texture, but it's a lovely one (provided you don't think bland meat is how meat should taste), and it worked lovely in curry.

I'm converted. Ox heart is great!

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#8 [url]

Feb 5 09 6:27 PM

Sounds fabulous, will keep an eye out for heart and give it a go. Can you do the same with Pig's heart?

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#12 [url]

Feb 5 09 8:22 PM

I love stuffed hearts of any sort. I go in with the knife from the top, cutting out all of the interior. Then remove valves and discard. The rest is minced, mixed with onions and crusts, a sprinkle of herbs and seasoning, and then I sew up the top to slow roast in gravy.

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#13 [url]

Apr 11 10 7:17 PM

Going back over the archives I wanted to add to this thread.

The last couple of ox hearts cooked up for humans were cooked in the slow cooker, before going in the oven for the last 10 minutes or so. What's left in the slow cooker is used as a stock, usually for a bean based stew or such like. The heart is eaten as a roast and the left overs sliced up and consumed in sandwiches by dave. He's disappointed every single time I bring an ox heart home and tell him that it's for the dog.

If there's anyone reading this who hasn't tried heart before - give it a ago. Go to a butcher and buy it from there because supermarkets over charge you and cut it up for you, giving you no choice. It's cheap, it goes a long way, and it tastes alright. My local butcher does a very good price on ox heart so saturday I bought enough meat for several meals all for the costly sum of £3.28.

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#17 [url]

Apr 12 10 8:56 PM

I actually get annoyed at the supermarkets for charging what they do for ox heart. It almost makes me want to tell random people in the supermarket to go find a proper butcher and save themselves some money. But then that's probably just me.

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